Waimate is synonymous with beautiful landscapes, Edwardian architecture and wild wallabies.

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The rural centre of Waimate sits between Timaru and Oamaru. For centuries the area was a seasonal hunting camp for Maori; when European settlers arrived, Waimate became a saw-milling town. The majority of the town’s original Edwardian buildings are still standing, given it a charmingly historic atmosphere.

These days Waimate is a centre for livestock farming, berry growing and forestry. It also has a microclimate that produces excellent Pinot Noir; visit one of the local boutique wineries for a taste.

This district is memorable for its population of wild wallabies, which were originally brought over from Australia in the 1870's. The wallabies occupy the Hunters Hills, and can be seen up close in animal parks around the town.

If you approach Waimate from the north, you’ll notice a white horse shape near the top of the hills. Created from slabs of concrete, the image is more than 25 metres high. The White Horse was made as a tribute to the Clydesdale horses that were used to break the land into pasture.

Functional facts: Approx. population 7200, information centre, wide range of shops and services.