In one day at Waitangi, you'll learn a huge amount about Maori culture and the early history of New Zealand.

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Here, the treaty was signed between Maori and the British. Waitangi is one of New Zealand's most significant historic sites. It's the place where the Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 between the British Crown and more than 500 Maori chiefs. The treaty agreed the terms by which New Zealand would become a British colony.

Today the Treaty Grounds are an opportunity to learn about Maori culture and the historical events associated with the signing of the treaty. Visit the Treaty House itself to see a replica of the original treaty; marvel at the fully carved Maori meeting house and one of the largest Maori war canoes in the country; and watch an informative, and highly entertaining, audio-visual presentation at the visitor centre. Live kapahaka performances are also held regularly and there’s a hotel located within the reserve that has a restaurant and bar.

Not only is Waitangi engaging from an educational point of view; it's also a very beautiful place to explore. From the small semi-formal garden that surrounds the Treaty House to the six kilometre forest walk that leads to Haruru Falls, the natural environment is spectacular. The shoreline provides a continuously changing panorama of the bay where warriors, whalers, sailors and settlers arrived in New Zealand.

Functional facts: Population: 800, visitor centre, hotel accommodation, restaurant/bar.