The meaning of Maori Bone and Greenstone Pendant Designs

Maori Bone and Greenstone Pendants carved in traditional designs carry a spiritual meaning as well. Learn what those designs mean, before you buy. :-)

Koru (looks like a curl)

The Maori Koru design is inspired by the New Zealand fern frond unfurling as it grows. It represents peace, tranquility, personal growth, positive change and awakening. It is associated with new life and harmony, so makes a wonderful gift for a new parent or child, newlyweds, or anyone starting on a new phase of their life.

Single Twist

A Maori twist symbolises the path of life. It is believed to have been based on Maori kete basket weaving. The path of life takes many twists and turns but carries on regardless. In the case of the Single Twist, the design simply means the path of life and can be called the Maori Eternity Symbol.

Double or Triple Twist

The Double and Triple Twist depict two new shoots growing together - it represents the joining of cultures, the bonding of friendship for life. The design shows the joining of two people in love or friendship for eternity, so makes a wonderful wedding or friendship gift. The Twist can also relate to the joining of two peoples or cultures.

Hei Matau (Fish Hook)

The fish hook was an important resource for Maori, as the sea provided a rich source of food. In Maori mythology, New Zealand was fished up out of the sea by Maui.

The fish hook signifies abundance and plenty, strength and determination. It is believed to bring peace, prosperity and good health. It is a device for catching good luck and energy, and is believed to provide safe journey over water. It is therefore considered a good luck charm by travellers, boaties, fishermen and surfers.

Tiki

The Tiki depicts the first mortal born to the Gods. It is also a strong fertility symbol, with the hands on the loins symbolising fertility. The Tiki is a good luck charm, and believed to give the wearer clarity of thought and great inner knowledge.

Manaia

The Manaia is a spiritual guardian, a guardian angel, to ward off danger and protect against intruders. It acts as a provider and protector over the sky, earth and sea.

The Manaia has a bird-like head, symbolising flight of the spirit. Its three fingers are believed to represent birth, life and death, symbolising the life cycle of man, or alternatively, the Three Baskets of Knowledge (the knowledge mankind needed from the gods, to be able to live successfully on earth).

Circles

The closed circle represents the circle of life, and the belief it has no beginning or end.

Whales and Dolphins

Whales and dolphins, and in fact all sea creatures and birds, were of huge importance to the Maori as a food and utensil source. Sea creatures were particularly revered. The whale is a symbol of great size and intelligence, and carvings of whales appear on some Maori meeting houses or food storehouses.

Whales and dolphins were believed to help some Maori navigate their way across the South Pacific during the Great Migration. Thus Whales and Dolphins are symbols of protection, and today this includes protection for travellers on all modes of transport.

The dolphin is also a symbol of friendship and harmony, and of playfulness, as seen in the way they playfully interact with humans swimming or boating in New Zealand waters.

Toki (Adze)

The Toki (adze) was an important Maori implement. In bone or greenstone, it was traditionally worn by Maori elders, as it represented power, wisdom and authority.

Kowhaiwhai

Kowhaiwhai is the beautiful scroll-like patterns seen on Maori meeting house ridge poles (tahu or tahuhu) and on the rafters (heke). They are usually painted red, white and black. These rafter paintings usually depict tribal lineage and thus represent authority by descent.

Kowhaiwhai was also seen on gourd water vessels, paddles, and the underside of canoe prows. Nowadays, its incorporation into Maori carvings or art represents the importance and significance of a loving family.

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