Cuando visites la región de Wairarapa, asegurate de vivir algunas de estas experiencias.

Explore the wine town of Martinborough

Filled with colonial charm, Martinborough has more than 30 wineries, most within walking distance from the picturesque town square, which is arranged in the shape of the flag of England. Some of New Zealand's best pinot noir comes from the village's family-owned vineyards.

  • Stroll around the square and admire the many heritage buildings before exploring the boutiques, cafes and restaurants, whose menus make the most of local agricultural produce.
  • Visit the Martinborough Wine Center, where you will be able to taste many wines from the wineries of the region in one place. You can also buy wines, which are then sent to your home.
  • With a wine map handy, enjoy an unguided hike or bike through the village's family-owned vineyards and discover why Martinborough is famous for its pinot noir. Don't forget to visit one of the town's award-winning olive groves.
  • Unwind with a guided wine tour, such as Tranzit Tours' daily "Martinborough Gourmet Wine Tour," which is ideal for those with limited time in the region who want to enjoy a diverse variety of vineyards. You can also come to Toast Martinborough in November, a world-class wine, food and music festival.

I discovered the charm of Greytown

Greytown is a Victorian country town with a metropolitan flair. Founded in 1854, it was New Zealand's first planned inland town. In recent years, it has transformed into a sophisticated town with free Wi-Fi hotspots along its main street.

  • Don't forget your credit card. The eclectic mix of independent boutiques, art galleries, antique shops and cafes make Greytown one of New Zealand's top shopping destinations.
  • Get energized at the Schoc Chocolate workshop, sample fresh pastries at The French Baker, and enjoy local produce in many cafes and restaurants.
  • Rent a two-seater bike to explore the surrounding countryside.
  • I walked the main street with most complete wooden Victorian buildings in New Zealand. You will find numerous examples of historical architecture.
  • Visit Papawai Marae(opens in new window) , the site of the first Maori parliament, and its wharenui (meeting house) that dates back to 1888.
  • Visit Cobblestones, Wairarapa's Early Settlers Museum, Wairarapa's Early Settlers Museum, where the history of the town's pioneers comes to life.

The art at Carterton

Carterton was founded in 1857 and is becoming increasingly recognized as an artistic center.

  • Carterton is a very interesting place for art and craft enthusiasts. Stroll the High Street and its second-hand shops, art galleries and cafes, or visit the home workshop of a local artisan.
  • I discovered Stonehenge Aotearoa , a modern and operational version of England's Stonehenge.
  • Drive a short distance north and explore the wine producing areas of Gladstone and Dakins Road.
  • Stroll through the historic Carrington House and its 12 acres of gardens, designed by famous landscaper Alfred Buxton. Open from September to April, only for group bookings.

Family fun in Masterton

Masterton is a dynamic and family town, the largest of the five that make up Wairarapa. For a long time, it was also an important center serving the surrounding farms.

  • In Queen Elizabeth Park you will find the fabulous Kids Own Playground, zip line, miniature golf, skate park and the suspension bridge, which leads to the deer park. It is an excellent place for a picnic.
  • At the historic Hood Airfield, step back in time with The Vintage Aviator Collection(opens in new window) (TVAL) and see one of the largest collections of original and operational WWI aircraft.
  • Drive north through the heart of New Zealand and be amazed by the seven-story tower of the Tui Brewery, which seems to appear out of nowhere. Visit Tui HQ(opens in new window) and enjoy a coffee or beer tasting.

A day at Castlepoint Beach

Castlepoint wild beach vacations are part of the local Wairarapa culture.

  • Climb to the top of the magnificent Castle Rock, which is 162 meters high.
  • Walk to Castlepoint Lighthouse, one of the last manned lighthouses to be built in New Zealand.
  • The Castlepoint Reserve is home to one of the most exotic species of daisies in the world, the Castlepoint daisy, also known as Brachyglottis compactus.
  • Investigate the fossil-filled limestone reef.
  • The waters off the beach are often visited by New Zealand sea lions and various species of dolphins. Small whales can sometimes be seen.

See exotic wildlife at the Pukaha Mount Bruce National Wildlife Center.

Pukaha Mount Bruce is where some of New Zealand's endangered species are raised and returned to the wild. 

  • Meet the wild kaka as it descends from the forest for its daily 3pm meal
  • Eels stir the water upon receiving their 1:30 pm feed
  • Watch the kiwis scratching the leaves in the night house.
  • You will also be able to see many exotic native birds in its lush kingdom, such as the kokako, hihis, takahe, kakariki and black teal.
  • Kids will also love the audiovisual presentation that is constantly on display, as well as the interactive exhibits.
  • Don't forget to take one of the short walks through the forest to see giant specimens of rimu, rata, kahikatea and tawa.

An expedition to Cape Palliser

Cape Palliser is the southernmost point of the North Island. Grab your camera, something for the picnic, and plan your day.

  • Walk through the forest to the Putangirua Pinnacles Scenic Reserve and see the spooky rock formations.
  • Visit the original commercial fishing village of Ngawi, where you can see tractors lining the beach.
  • I climbed the 250 steps of the Cape Palliser Lighthouse, built in 1897.
  • On the side of the route, you will observe the largest resident colony of New Zealand fur seals on the North Island.
  • The rich history of early Maori occupations is still evident in the landscape. You will be able to find terraces and wells for the storage of kumara.

A day at Castlepoint Beach

Vacations on the wild beaches of Castlepoint are part of the local culture of Wairarapa.

  • Climb to the top of the impressive Castle Rock - 162 meters high.
  • Walk to Castlepoint Lighthouse, one of the last manned lighthouses built in New Zealand.
  • The Castlepoint Reserve is home to one of the rarest daisies in the world - the Castlepoint Daisy, also known as Brachyglottis compactus.
  • Investigate fossil-rich limestone coral reefs.
  • Offshore waters are frequently visited by New Zealand fur seals and several species of dolphins. Sometimes, you can see little whales.

See wildlife at Pukaha Mount Bruce National Wildlife Center

Mount Bruce Pukaha is where some of New Zealand's endangered species are bred and returned to the wild. 

  • Meet wild kaka while diving out of the forest at 3pm, their daily meal.
  • The eels rippled the water during their daily meal at 1:30 p.m.
  • Look at the kiwi sticking out among the litter of leaves in her nocturnal home.
  • Many rare distinctive birds - kokako, stitchbirds, takahe, kakariki and black teal can also be seen in their lush world.
  • Kids will always love the continuous audiovisual presentation and interactive educational display.
  • Be sure to take one of the many short walks through the forest with rimu, flat, kahikatea, and gigantic laughter.

Expedition to Cape Palliser

Cape Palliser is the southernmost point of the North Island. Grab your camera, go on a picnic, and enjoy your day.

  • Walk through the forest to Putangirua Pinnacles Scenic Reserve and see some creepy-looking rock formations.
  • Visit the quaint commercial fishing village of Ngawi, where tractors line the coast.
  • Climb 250 steps to Cape Palliser Lighthouse, built in 1897.
  • From the side of the road, observe the largest colony of resident fur seals on the North Island.
  • The rich history of the early occupation of the Maori people is still evident in this landscape. Look for terraces and kumara pits.

Quizás también le interese…